Letters To The Editor

Vote Yes

To the Editor:

I grew up in Cleveland Heights, I live here and now I own a business here. Like many young people, I left the region at the first chance. My job took me around the country and our personal travels took us around the world. I spent extended time in many communities, and although I enjoyed visiting most of them, very few had the personality of Cleveland Heights.

When my career offered us the opportunity to live wherever we wanted, we jumped at the chance to move back to 44118.

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Volume 6, Issue 11, Posted 12:57 PM, 10.01.2013

Reaching Heights board endorses Issue 81

To the Editor:

The Reaching Heights Board of Directors enthusiastically endorses Issue 81. The plan was developed by CH and UH citizens after a year long effort and thoughtful analysis of district physical infrastructure needs. Issue 81 reflects the values of the Heights community—preserving the past, while preparing for future generations. 

Reaching Heights’s focus is excellence in public education. District buildings, especially the high school, have reached a point where they hinder rather than promote quality education. The costs to maintain these aging structures have become an inefficient use of taxpayer dollars.

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Volume 6, Issue 11, Posted 12:36 PM, 10.29.2013

Issue 81 and handicapped accessibility

To the Editor:

While there are numerous reasons to support Issue 81, the bond issue to fund renovations of CH-UH’s middle and high schools, I would like to highlight one very important aspect: handicapped accessibility.

Clearly, our district does a fantastic job of educating its students, sending scores of graduates to first- and second-tier universities every year, and its extracurricular offerings are extensive and impressive. Our schools also meet the needs of every student regardless of physical limitation, abiding by the laws and requirements to provide all children with free, appropriate public education. But the physical structure of our buildings hinders the ability of the schools to meet the physical needs of those students with mobility issues, including those with physical and/or developmental disabilities and students (and staff) with acute, medical issues, such as healing from back or leg surgery, as well as disabled parents and grandparents who wish to participate in or view school programs.

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Volume 6, Issue 11, Posted 10:51 AM, 10.22.2013

We are the owners

To the Editor,

I am a graduate of Heights High, and parent of three kids in CH-UH schools, currently at all levels—elementary, middle and high school.

I am committed to our CH-UH school district in all its complexities, strengths and weaknesses. It is a remarkable and special place.

I have been involved, since the beginning, with the schools facilities process. Now, after three years of work, we have a plan and a bond issue (81) on the table. There are many reasons I know this is the right thing to do, from [maintaining] appropriate temperatures in classrooms to the importance of spaces that reflect the value we place on education and the potential of our youth.

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Volume 6, Issue 11, Posted 10:10 AM, 10.15.2013

Student performance trajectory is positive

The most upsetting argument against CH-UH’s Issue 81 is the claim that our schools are failing. This is frustrating because it ignores the obvious physical needs of our buildings, but also because it simply isn’t true. The schools are thriving. Our teachers are teaching and our students are learning.

Here’s the reality: Our district serves poor children. This isn’t an excuse, nor a shift of blame. I happen to be proud that we serve poor children and believe that fact should be celebrated. But, as research shows, children raised in poverty come to school less ready to learn, already behind their peers on the first day of kindergarten. They often have smaller vocabularies, shorter attention spans and few of the preliteracy skills required for learning to read and write. These problems continue throughout their educational careers, which are often disrupted by frequent moves in and out of schools and districts.

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Volume 6, Issue 11, Posted 10:07 AM, 10.15.2013

LWV endorses school facilities bond issue

To the Editor:

The League of Women Voters supports the $134.8 million bond issue that the CH-UH Board of Education has placed on the November ballot. These funds will support the implementation of the first phase of a comprehensive K–12 plan, carefully developed with extensive citizen involvement.

The plan will overhaul the core operating systems and upgrade the learning environment of our school facilities to better meet educational needs for the next 50 years. The first phase will take Heights High down to its bones, replacing all operating systems with up-to-date and energy-efficient solutions, and will substantially renovate  Monticello and Roxboro middle schools.

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Volume 6, Issue 10, Posted 1:53 PM, 10.01.2013

Economic concerns weigh on residents considering facilities bond issue

To the Editor:

I attended the meeting on Sept. 11 about the Cleveland Heights-University Heights school district’s proposed bond issue to fund major renovation and updates of the district’s school buildings. Supporters of the bond issue made a compelling case to no longer delay this long-overdue renovation of our school buildings. It seemed, at least for the majority attending the meeting, that there was no disagreement on this point. 

However, during a “sidebar” conversation with another resident outside of the actual meeting, it became clear to me that, for at least some of the citizens of the district, the need to rebuild and upgrade the school facilities is not the central issue. They understand and agree that the need exists. The real issue for these citizens is and will be an economic one, pitting the cost of long-term financing of the facilities plan against the continued need to fund school district operations at the same time.

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Volume 6, Issue 10, Posted 1:47 PM, 10.01.2013

Public schools are for everyone

To the Editor:

I had a hard time deciding whether to move to Cleveland Heights in 1996. A combination of factors led me to make the move. The flashes of city life I saw on Coventry reminded me of my years in Chicago, and the occasional hillside brought back pleasant childhood memories. Also interesting were the city’s claims to diversity and its strategies for maintaining racial integration. Because I don’t have children and because I had most recently lived in a place with a viable urban school system, the public schools didn’t catch my attention at first.

After living here for a while I noticed how our public schools contribute to our collective everyday life. I lived near Coventry Village at first and the presence of Coventry School struck me as the key to it seeming like a complete city in its own right.

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Volume 6, Issue 10, Posted 11:08 AM, 09.24.2013

How to pass the CH-UH facilities bond issue

To the Editor:

“What will change?” This is the question the education leaders of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights City School District have to clearly and concisely answer if the facilities bond issue has any possibility of approval by the voters. The need to rehabilitate, refurbish and restructure the district’s buildings and infrastructure is apparent. This effort should have been initiated years ago. The leadership of the district has failed to connect the fulfillment of the facilities plan with a clearly articulated and creditable plan to improve the education program of the district. I believe that this failure puts the passage of the bond issue out of reach.

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Volume 6, Issue 10, Posted 11:13 AM, 09.24.2013

Persuaded by touring Heights High

To the Editor:

Last Tuesday I had an eye-opening experience. On a tour, I saw sections of Heights High that, as a satisfied parent of two successful graduates, I had never seen before. Beyond the restored auditorium and the functional social room that are most often seen by the public, there is an old building with dysfunctional infrastructure that is expensive to operate and difficult to maintain. I had no idea!

As we walked, we experienced amazingly uneven climate control. The auditorium was chilly but most of the building was sweltering. The ancient air circulation system makes such a loud hum in the music room that tuning instruments is a challenge. Lighting is poor in many areas, and we learned that the electrical systems have no capacity to incorporate additional technology. Student learning is compromised by such an environment!

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Volume 6, Issue 10, Posted 11:04 AM, 09.17.2013

Public education matters

To the Editor:

Public school education matters.

We can say what we want about education, but our country’s future hangs on how well our children are educated. Public school education is the pathway whereby more than 90 percent of us learned to be social, economic and cultural citizens participating in the Great American experiment.

It is fairly well established that wealth creation, or, said another way, what an individual earns in his or her lifetime of work, directly correlates to the quality of education received and individual school performance. Those who perform better do better. Irrespective of the growth in school-choice options, the vast majority of Americans are, and will continue to be, educated in public schools.

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Volume 6, Issue 10, Posted 12:23 PM, 09.16.2013

CH needs a better public records policy

To the Editor:

Cleveland Heights should have a public records policy of which it can be proud. There is room for improvement.

The city’s public records policy is difficult for the average person to find on its website. One must locate the link to the codified ordinances and then run a search query.

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Volume 6, Issue 10, Posted 3:16 PM, 10.01.2013

Coventry-Overlook traffic signal schedule seems a hazaard

To the Editor:

In the past six months or so, it seems the traffic lights at the intersection of Coventry and Overlook roads have gone from green-yellow-red in each direction, all day and all night, to green-yellow-red in each direction during the day and flashing red on Overlook and flashing yellow (caution) on Coventry 24 hours a day.

This makes it very difficult to cross Coventry anywhere between Cedar Road and Euclid Heights Boulevard, if not really between Fairmount and Euclid Heights boulevards. At all times, except the very wee hours of the morning graveyard-shift time, it is a challenge to scoot across Coventry between cars that are coming in both directions. When going west across the intersection on Overlook, the trees on the east side of Coventry to the south of the intersection block visibility in that direction, making it hard to see if there is a car just 50 feet away.

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Volume 6, Issue 10, Posted 3:15 PM, 10.01.2013

Beware if you are passing by this intersection

To the Editor:

There is a big patch of poison ivy at the intersection of Kenilworth and Mayfield roads; the exact address is 2555 Kenilworth Road.

Now, that might not sound like a big deal, and for many people it would not be. However, some people experience severe allergic reactions to poison ivy, [and] even end up in the hospital after they come into contact with it. So, this patch should be eradicated by the city or whoever else might be responsible. That is particularly the case because this poison ivy is located adjacent to a bus stop and many people either walk or bike past that intersection every day.

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Volume 6, Issue 10, Posted 1:57 PM, 10.01.2013

School district scheduling of an event for parents creates obstacles

To the Editor:

I have a concern about the CH-UH school district's poor communication about a major change to a traditional event for the 2013-14 school year.
 
I'm a Roxboro Elementary parent and have a full-time job. This year, the district scheduled Curriculum "Night" for 4:30 p.m. on a weekday (Monday, Aug. 26). The date and time were communicated to parents about two weeks prior to the event. This left insufficient time for me to arrange for time off from work to attend, and I was only able to be there for the last 20 minutes of the session. I have spoken to a few other working parents who encountered the same obstacle.

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Volume 6, Issue 10, Posted 12:46 PM, 09.13.2013

Citizens Leadership meeting attendees dedicated to Cleveland Heights

To the Editor:

I am glad to see an article about our group, Citizens Leadership, and its first meeting ["Cleveland Heights citizens meet to discuss leadership and concerns," Heights Observer July 2013].

However, I have an issue with the inference made in the paragraph that begins, "Not everyone present expressed dissatisfaction with the city." The pride of place attributed to two citizens in that part of the article was in fact shared by all in attendance.

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Volume 6, Issue 9, Posted 1:20 PM, 08.30.2013

Clarifiying the mission of Revolution Books, and a correction

To the Editor:
 
I deeply appreciate the story you published on Revolution Books in the July 2013 Heights Observer. The writer prominently conveyed that the mission of Revolution Books is to contribute to changing the world in the interests of humanity. I particularly liked that he mentioned that we work cooperatively with other people wanting a better world. We are very pleased that more people have visited the store since the article was published.
 
The powers that be have a history of using positive articles like [the one written by Jim Henke] to mischaracterize revolution and communism. The story says, “Formed in 1975, the RCP [Revolutionary Communist Party] was founded on the belief that U.S. imperialism will never end peacefully and that the only way to liberate the world is through Communist revolution.” This statement could be subject to misinterpretation. In this country today, the authorities viciously try to destroy any voice that exposes the crimes of the government, and especially if it offers people a viable alternative. I ask that you print a clarification to make clear that the strategy of the RCP is not to start the “revolution” by advocating violence.

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Volume 6, Issue 9, Posted 1:18 PM, 08.30.2013

Disqualification of Jazzercise was arbitrary

To the Editor:

I wonder why Jazzercise at the Cleveland Heights Community Center has been disqualified from FutureHeights’s 2013 Best of the Heights awards. The official explanation is that Jazzercise has won too many times. Actually, Jazzercise has won only twice in eight years. However, Aladdin’s, Tommy’s, the Stone Oven, Quintana’s Barber and Dream Spa, and Nighttown all appear on the 2013 Best of the Heights ballot. All have won multiple Best of the Heights awards.

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Volume 6, Issue 9, Posted 1:09 PM, 08.30.2013

Changes to Cain Park signs may not be for the better

To the Editor:

I was both shocked and dismayed to be slapped in the face the other day by the new electronic signs placed at either end of Cain Park. I know there has been far too much money (taxpayer money?) spent to call for their removal, although correcting this mistake would be well worth the price. While I am well aware that Cleveland Heights is no quaint little New England village, neither are we Beachwood and certainly Cain Park is no Legacy Village.

While it appears that they have been designed to reflect some subtlety for what they actually are, their addition to the landscape has removed all of the charm to the entrances of one of our city’s most valued assets.

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Volume 6, Issue 9, Posted 12:46 PM, 08.30.2013

Cleveland Heights cares about democracy

To the Editor:

Cleveland Heights voters just showed they care deeply about democracy. And we hope they will have the opportunity to show it again in November.

More than 3,000 people in Cleveland Heights showed they cared by signing the Move to Amend initiative petition. Thanks to them, we passed an important milestone in the effort to amend the U.S. Constitution to firmly establish that individuals, not corporations, are entitled to constitutional rights. More than a symbolic gesture, passage of the initiative would instruct our U.S. and state representatives to take action on this issue.

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Volume 6, Issue 8, Posted 2:06 PM, 07.31.2013

A park at Meadowbrook and Lee?

One year, at a local holiday pottery sale, I bought my younger daughter a decorative plate; it is all black except for one corner where there is a rising yellow moon. Underneath the moon are the words, “The barn burned down, now I can see the moon.” I could never be that sanguine, but I am a firm believer that change creates opportunity. My point?  The Orlean Company’s plan to build apartments and retail on the city-owned property at Meadowbrook and Lee fell through. I don’t know why.

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Volume 6, Issue 6, Posted 10:38 AM, 05.21.2013

Brick streets are one of the city's many assets

To the Editor:

I am worried about one of the opinions expressed by Mary Dunbar in her article "Cleveland Heights road repairs" [Heights Observer, April 1]. Ms. Dunbar wrote, "Though charming, Cleveland Heights's few remaining brick roads can be cost prohibitive to maintain. Covering them with asphalt improves driving safety and makes repairs affordable."

This seems to me to be a curious statement from a member of Cleveland Heights City Council. Cleveland Heights is blessed with many charming homes, commercial buildings and parks. If we only consider cost, I guess it is true that all of our charming assets could be replaced with alternatives that would make them less "cost prohibitive to maintain," but then Cleveland Heights would be just another suburban clone community.

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Volume 6, Issue 6, Posted 10:20 AM, 05.14.2013

Date set for public records trial regarding Taylor Road rehabilitation project

A common pleas judge has rejected an attempt by the City of Cleveland Heights to block a public records case from going to trial.

[We], Cleveland Heights residents Douglas Whipple and Susan Tuck-Whipple, had submitted two public records requests to the city in 2011--before the project began. They sought records relating to the conduct of city council and the administration leading up to the rehabilitation of Taylor Road. The project narrowed South Taylor Road and allocated all of the resulting green space to the commercial east side of the street and none to the residential west side.

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Volume 6, Issue 6, Posted 4:34 PM, 05.10.2013

Gun violence and gospel values

To the Editor:

The issue of gun accessibility and gun control divides our nation. Most Americans agree that sensible gun control is a good thing. Getting specific about what that looks like, however, separates us into confused and suspicious camps. Good people and good friends disagree. Within the Forest Hill congregation there exists a variety of opinions, shaped by where one grew up, where one lives now, previous gun usage or ownership, and one’s interpretation of the Second Amendment.  

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Volume 6, Issue 5, Posted 12:59 PM, 04.30.2013

Free parking shows that CH is pro-business

To the Editor,

I wish to commend Mayor Kelley and Cleveland Heights City Council for their recent action to provide free parking in all city lots on the last weekend of each month in 2013.

This is exactly the type of vote that sends a clear message that Cleveland Heights is pro-business. It encourages those of us who are already conducting business in Cleveland Heights, and helps attract new business. Indeed, in a conversation I had yesterday with a potential new business coming to Cedar Fairmount, it demonstrates that we are a good place to do business.

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Volume 6, Issue 2, Posted 10:58 AM, 01.24.2013

Coventry Library vital part of Coventry Village

To the Editor:

Though it offers a different kind of activity from the bustling eateries, taverns and shops just down the street, Coventry Village Library—a branch of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library system—is very much a part of the Coventry Village neighborhood. In fact, with its dignified English Medieval Vernacular (according to the library website) architectural style, and its noncommercial land use, the library helps ease the transition from Coventry’s mercantile strip to the residential areas down Washington Boulevard.

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Volume 6, Issue 1, Posted 7:09 PM, 01.02.2013

Resident urges against spending estimated $200 million on new school facilities

To the Editor:

I was very disappointed in your editorial.

I attended a number of public meeting about the school facility "plan" and I spoke at a couple--mostly though, pretty ignored by arrogant SB and "academics" who are hellbent on taxing us to death to go $200 million into debt to build "fancy all new building."

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Volume 5, Issue 12, Posted 3:28 PM, 11.29.2012

Spread the word: support independent businesses this holiday season

To the Editor,

It is holiday season for all of us, especially retailers. For the past few years, I have taken the letter below and added a paragraph or two (I guess you can call that creative reuse or self plagiarism). The issue of local independent businesses is near and dear to my heart and is so important to the viability and vitality of our neighborhoods. We must all make a conscientious effort to support local businesses, from the neighborhood bookstore and record store, which face the toughest battles of us "indies," to the locally owned music clubs that struggle to keep afloat.

It's been five years since I wrote my first letter—dated Holiday Season 2007. I believe that there is finally light at the end of the tunnel. Business is picking up! Most retailers are finally saying goodbye to the trend of decreased annual sales. Maybe it's the economy or maybe it's the community coming together to support local businesses. The bottom line is that it feels good, and we all say THANKS!

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Volume 5, Issue 12, Posted 3:18 PM, 11.21.2012

Cuyahoga County Public Library Board plans sale of South Euclid's Telling Mansion

The Telling Mansion is for sale. 
 
The Telling Mansion has been home to the South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch of the Cuyahoga County Public Library since 1952. Quoting directly from the library’s website, “Mr. Fiske (Library Board President from 1946–54) recognized the potential of the Telling mansion, knew it was for sale, and felt the unique building should be preserved for use as a public library.” 
 
On Oct. 30, Robert Varley, the current library president, and Sari Feldman, the library director, put Telling Mansion on the market.

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Volume 5, Issue 12, Posted 5:29 PM, 11.12.2012

Heights performance of 'Phantom' was spectacular

To the Editor:

As a former resident of Cleveland Heights, I was delighted to be asked to attend the Saturday performance of “Phantom of the Opera” at Heights High. Having seen “Phantom” three times on professional stages and once at the movies, I was somewhat doubtful, in advance, of the quality of a high school performance. This is one of the most difficult of all Broadway shows—vocally and musically.

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Volume 5, Issue 12, Posted 7:29 AM, 11.12.2012

Promote safer bicycling and motoring

To the Editor,

Bike Cleveland is vying to win $10,000 worth of pro-bono communication services to develop a public awareness campaign to promote safer biking environments, in the Heights and across Greater Cleveland. Help Bike Cleveland win by going to Dix & Eaton's Facebook page and liking the Bike Cleveland entry before noon, Nov. 12.

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Volume 5, Issue 12, Posted 2:22 PM, 11.09.2012

Neither religion nor just hamstrings

To the Editor:

All of us at the Atma Center rejoiced after receiving news that we were named the Best Place to Express Your Spirituality in the 2012 FutureHeights Best of the Heights awards. Then we imagined some might wonder why a yoga school won in this category, dominated by nominations for churches and synagogues.

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Volume 5, Issue 11, Posted 11:44 AM, 10.31.2012

Why a solid fence for Cumberland Pool?

To the Editor:

I am writing regarding a possible plan to construct a solid fence around Cumberland Pool that is under discussion and vote by Cleveland Heights City Council members.

I am 64 years old—a resident of Cleveland Heights my whole life, save a few years in my early 20s. I spent every summer of my life from probably 6–8 to 18 at Cumberland pool. The pool has changed over the years—no longer does one have to go through the toe inspection and the cold water foot bath, the rules have been relaxed so one can bring a book, you can wear your suit to the pool!—but the basics haven't changed.

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Volume 5, Issue 10, Posted 10:39 AM, 10.03.2012

Remembering Charlie Ault

Cleveland Heights recently lost a hero. Charlie Ault died on Aug. 31. You might not know who Charlie was, but you have undoubtedly benefited from his work and passion. He was a founding member of the Forest Hill Church Housing Corporation, which eventually became the Home Repair Resource Center (HRRC). Ault and fellow parishioners began fighting social injustices and shady real estate practices during the 1970s, starting with a house remodel and sale. Cleveland Heights was changing, and Ault and his newly founded group were advocating for peoples' rights, their community's values and the strength of neighborhoods.

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Volume 5, Issue 10, Posted 8:02 PM, 09.16.2012

Kudos to the Cleveland Heights Community Center

To the Editor:

When the community center gym was closed for maintenance from Aug. 21 to Aug. 26, I realized how addicted I had become to my workout routine at the gym two or three times a week.

I’ve long been impressed by how well the gym is being run and maintained, and then it reopened, spic and span, after certain repairs, general cleaning and check-up of the exercise machines, I thought it high time to write this public letter of appreciation.

Hey, all of you community center managers and staffers, you’re doing an exemplary job! Thank you!

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Volume 5, Issue 10, Posted 12:45 PM, 09.10.2012

Cedar Fairmount SID thanks city and mayor of Cleveland Heights for their support

To the Editor,

I wish to give sincere thanks and praise to Cleveland Heights City Council's unanimous decision to declare Myxx a public nuisance. We in the Cedar Fairmont district have striven very hard to make this an attractive destination for vistors and residents. The appaling indifference shown by the owner of Myxx to all of her neighbors needed to be acted upon swiftly and indeed was, both by council and our Cleveland Heights Police Department. I also wish to thank Chief Robertson for his part in not allowing things to have gotten worse, which most certainly could have happened given the powderkeg nature of what was going on there.

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Volume 5, Issue 10, Posted 3:25 PM, 08.30.2012

Visit Ten Thousand Villages: a happy experience

On Sunday, Aug. 12, the Cedar Fairmount Summer Festival transformed the streets of our community into an exciting, vibrant area. In a tent on Surrey Road, Ten Thousand Villages presented a craft experience for young people to learn and create batik art paintings. At Ten Thousand Villages, there are numerous pieces of batik art for sale. 

The tent also had information about volunteering at Ten Thousand Villages. The store’s assistant manager talked about the experience of shopping and working there—experiences that bring satisfaction to customers and to the artisans who make the figurines, bowls, textiles, jewelry and other items in the store.

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Volume 5, Issue 9, Posted 10:15 AM, 09.02.2012

Heights Youth Club says 'thanks'

To the Editor:

Cleveland Heights celebrated its tradition of serving great food at the 4th annual Taste of The Heights held on June 14.  More than 200 guests at the Heights Youth Club (HYC) on Lee Road savored delicious platefuls of food, sipped a beverage or glass of wine, and enjoyed wonderful jazz entertainment provided by Hubb’s Groove.

Local restaurateurs rallied behind the club by providing a favorite dish, prepared by their chefs. The HYC board of directors wants to extend a special thank you to Jimmy O’Neill for orchestrating the participating restaurants.

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Volume 5, Issue 9, Posted 9:56 AM, 09.02.2012

Former Detroit resident objects to CH mayor's characterization of that city

I read with interest the Heights Observer article about Myxx being declared a public nuisance. I have no opinion on the issue one way or the other (this is the first I've heard of the problem and it's not that close to my house). However, I DO take issue with a statement made by the mayor in the last paragraph:

“This is not downtown Detroit, this is Cleveland Heights, Ohio,” said Mayor Kelley.

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Volume 5, Issue 9, Posted 10:48 AM, 08.14.2012

One-man community garden needs assistants

To the Editor:

“Who will help me plant this seed?” asked the Little Red Hen in the fairy tale. Nobody wanted to help with anything until it was time to eat the bread.

In a similar true-life story, Steve Warner, a Cleveland Heights High School science teacher and Environmental Club faculty advisor, has been caring for the Taylor Road Learning Garden all summer by himself, with the help of a scattered few volunteers and the University Heights Fire Department.

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Volume 5, Issue 8, Posted 4:47 PM, 08.01.2012

Dog-free Cleveland Heights parks are underused

To the Editor

Your front page article about the Dog Project caught my eye when I saw a copy in a recent visit to City Hall. We have lived in Cleveland Heights for some 15 years. During that time, we could count on one hand (thumb not needed) the times we've walked in Cleveland Heights Parks.

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Volume 5, Issue 8, Posted 10:10 AM, 07.12.2012

Dog Project Update

To the Editor:

Many thanks to the citizens of Cleveland Heights, the media and Cleveland Heights City Council for much good dialogue about going dog-friendly in Cleveland Heights parks, namely Cain Park. Because this is such a multifaceted issue with many considerations, the Dog Project Committee felt it important to gather the community’s input before forging ahead with a petition. No matter your viewpoint on this subject, we invite you to share your feedback. In doing so, you’ll help guide how we proceed with the petition. In the bigger picture, this is all about making Cain Park and Cleveland Heights safer and even better places to be.

To take the survey click here through July 31.

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Volume 5, Issue 8, Posted 10:50 AM, 07.10.2012

Discrimination mars recent Pride Weekend event

To the Editor:

On Saturday, June 23, Cleveland celebrated Pride Weekend. This event is held each June in celebration of the Stonewall Riots of 1969 which is often revered as the beginning of the LGBTQ Civil Rights Movement. Amongst the celebration and awareness-raising was an unfortunate event which speaks directly to why such events are still necessary and full equality has not yet arrived.

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Volume 5, Issue 8, Posted 10:11 AM, 07.06.2012

Concern over school board's facilities plan process

To the Editor:

We would like to add our voices to the opinions expressed by Eric Silverman regarding the process of the School Board and its likely dysfunctional outcomes.

We are parents of two Heights High graduates, both of whom have achieved excellence in part based on the fine foundations they obtained from Roxboro schools and the high school. In 1976, we deliberately chose to live in the Roxboro section to avoid the obvious, at least to us, deficits of the so-called open plan schools that had arrived on the CH scene. We now have one grandson who just completed Kindergarten at Roxboro and thus have a strong continuing interest in excellent schools.

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Volume 5, Issue 8, Posted 11:05 AM, 07.03.2012

Dogs in parks?

To the Editor:

For some who suffer from allergies, dogs are definitely not “part of the part of the 21st century family.” While many dogs are well-behaved and well-trained, too many are not, jumping up and nosing strangers without invitation. For those with severe allergies, like my wife and sons, contact with dog dander or saliva brings on rashes and severe breathing difficulties, which may require hospitalization.

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Volume 5, Issue 7, Posted 12:58 PM, 06.28.2012

Thanks to CH-UH School Board for its Millikin School decision.

Members of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights School Board are to be commended for their leadership. They refused to give in to the demands of a small vocal group regarding the sale of Millikin School. The board recognized the real issue behind the sale of this public property—the land, not the building, is important.

This piece of land has significant economic potential because it could easily be connected to Severance Town Center. This land contains a wetland and provides a green buffer between the largest assemblage of concrete and asphalt in the city and the residential neighborhoods nearby.

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Volume 5, Issue 7, Posted 10:29 PM, 06.11.2012

Ensuing schools tragedy

To the Editor:

I am writing about the ensuing tragedy—and I think it is a tragedy—wherein our destructive, willful and reality-blind school system is once again headed towards a catastrophic tax nightmare for all Cleveland Heights and University Heights taxpayers. That is, the sudden new plan for knocking down and/or remodeling every single school building, and once again, dabbling in trendy nonsense about open classrooms.

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Volume 5, Issue 7, Posted 6:33 PM, 06.08.2012

Letter to Editor - VNA hospice program

To the Editor:

It was enlightening to see an article about hospice in your wonderful publication. This letter is to broaden the readership's understanding of the hospice process.

The well-respected Visiting Nurse Association (VNA) has an innovative program called "special care" which cares for individuals who qualify for hospice but aren't yet ready to take that step.

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Volume 5, Issue 6, Posted 12:54 PM, 05.30.2012

Retain Fairfax property for community uses

To the Editor:

I am following the proposed reorganization of the schools in Cleveland Heights, and am interested in the possible destiny of the property occupied by Fairfax Elementary School, which will be closed [under the school facilities plan]. I think this property should be retained by the city for community use. I would recommend it be repurposed for multiple uses including a community garden (existing use), as well as a park that would include both a playground for children and a dog park.

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Volume 5, Issue 6, Posted 1:01 PM, 05.30.2012

Alexander's success at Monticello

I am writing to express my appreciation for everything that Monticello has done for my son, Alexander Buffington, a seventh grader at Monticello, who has been on the honor roll all year. He has autism and was in Amber Hawes' classroom last year and is with her again this year.

Amber Hawes is an amazing teacher who discovered that Alexander has ability in math. She worked very hard with him in sixth grade, and moved him into the transmath class with Genevieve McDougal, who made sure he was welcome in the class.

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Volume 5, Issue 6, Posted 1:04 PM, 05.30.2012

Cats and birds

To the Editor:

The bird feeders are out and the birds are everywhere. Yesterday on our step was a dead one, killed no doubt by a neighbor’s cat, doing what comes naturally. I urge everyone to please keep their cats indoors until July so these little birds can have a nesting season during early spring and summer.

Samuel A. Nigro, M.D.

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Volume 5, Issue 6, Posted 1:06 PM, 05.30.2012

Earth Day: Remember nature in the debate over Millikin and other school buildings

This Earth Day, April 22, remember that you can make a difference. The public attitude favoring a balance with nature, firmly and persistently expressed to our elected officials, can and has changed the world for the better.

The first Earth Day observances were held on April 22, 1970. I was in high school then, in another part of town. Our schoolbooks said the sky was blue, but when we looked toward Cleveland what we saw was an angry yellow-brown haze. I can still feel how my eyes would sting and my lungs would burn on the worst summer days. 

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Volume 5, Issue 5, Posted 10:37 AM, 04.17.2012

School board remains silent on Millikin

After several board meetings which were attended by hundreds of Cleveland Heights citizens, and after hundreds of phone calls, dozens of letters to local newspaper editors, and a clear outpouring of public support from all segments of the Cleveland Heights community, the CH-UH school board has continued to ignore the voices of the citizens that they represent and accept the offer that Mosdos Ohr HaTorah has made to purchase the former Millikin School.

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Volume 5, Issue 5, Posted 2:38 PM, 04.16.2012

Residents are watching and waiting to see how district handles Millikin

To the Editor,
 
I am writing about the Millikin property, which remains an open issue. As the Cleveland Heights-University Heights school board has its facilities evaluation to deal with declining population, and is promising to close more neighborhood buidings, taxpayers are wondering if Fairfax, Gearity, and Noble neighborhoods will suffer the same drop in property values with the abandonment of those buildings, incurring the crime, trouble and disregard for upkeep that Millikin residents have had to put up with.

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Volume 5, Issue 5, Posted 9:50 AM, 04.10.2012

Take a breath on Millikin discussion

To the Editor:

I am sorry to see the anger surrounding the current debate over the future of the Millikin School property.

I do not have a horse in this race, but I do have some questions:

What has changed since last year, when the Board of Education (BOE) last solicited requests for proposals for the Millikin property?

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Volume 5, Issue 4, Posted 9:43 AM, 04.04.2012

Heights religious communities urge action on Millikin

[This was submitted to the editor for publication as an open letter to the CH-UH Board of Education and the Cleveland Heights City Council.]

To the Editor:

As go the school district and each of the various smaller educational communities, so go all of our communities. We, the undersigned of religious communities in the Heights and members of the Heights InterFaith Council, believe that the Cleveland Heights-University Heights City School District in its abandonment of a community asset in the Severance Millikin School is doing a disservice to the greater Heights Community.

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Volume 5, Issue 4, Posted 12:10 PM, 03.27.2012

On the future of Millikin School property

To the Editor:

Regarding the discussion about the Millikin School, the residents of Cleveland Heights need to understand the whole picture. There is an offer to purchase the building by a nonprofit organization at what seems like fair market value. There is also an offer from a call center, a business that may bring jobs to the area, which may become a significant revenue stream.

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Volume 5, Issue 4, Posted 9:57 AM, 03.23.2012

Board should take the time to make the right decision on Millikin

To the Editor:

Unfortunately in the cacophony surrounding Severance-Millikin Elementary School, three different issues are being wrapped into one, muddying the waters: the condition of the site, the future of the site and the value of the site.  

I will agree with those who lament the current appearance of Millikin, and the CH-UH City School District has not helped its case by working to make sure the building and grounds look as good or better than open buildings, as doing this could thwart this vein of criticism.

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Volume 5, Issue 4, Posted 11:45 AM, 03.20.2012