A & E News

Burning River Baroque to perform at Stone Oven on March 23

Burning River Baroque, a nonprofit early-music group, will return to Cleveland Heights on Thursday, March 23, with “On the Brink of Insanity: Portrayals of Women as Mad, Crazy, and Unhinged.” The program will be performed at 6:30 p.m., at the Stone Oven, 2267 Lee Road; free-will donations will be gratefully accepted.

Dramatic musical works often contain scenes of overwhelming emotion in which male characters are portrayed as being consumed by power. When women are overcome with emotion, however, male composers often attribute madness or craziness to them.

In this program, Burning River Baroque will present a selection of works by George Frideric Handel, John Eccles, and Henry Purcell in which women’s passions and emotional expressions render them unhinged in the eyes of their creators. A set of Sephardic folk songs will depict ways in which female narrators describe various types of insanity.

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Volume 10, Issue 4, Posted 7:07 PM, 03.19.2017

The Salon artists comprise spring show at St. Paulís gallery

The Nicholson B. White Gallery at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 2747 Fairmount Blvd., announces its spring show, The Salon Shows at St. Paul’s. The exhibition opens with an artists’ reception on Friday, March 10, 5–7 p.m., where participating artists will greet guests and discuss their creative processes. The show runs through June 4.

Featured artists are Bonnie Dolin (oils and pastels), Jennifer Leach (woodcut prints), Leslye Discont Arian (mixed media and clay) and Tom Roese (acrylics and graphite).

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Volume 10, Issue 3, Posted 11:17 AM, 03.01.2017

Heights Arts goes 'Public' with March exhibition

Design and illustration continue to expand beyond their traditional roles in publishing and advertising. Influenced by graffiti and new technologies in animation and gaming, illustrators create stories about world issues, popular culture, even trends in daily life. Artists take issues out of context and reexamine them in previously unconsidered perpectives, challenging viewers to assess their own part in the whole. 

PUBLIC CONSCIENCE through graphics and illustration, which opens Friday, March 3, 6–9 p.m., in the Heights Arts main gallery, examines these trends among Northeast Ohio artists. Co-curated by artists Leslye Arian and Dave King, the group exhibition showcases the work of Laura and Gary Dumm, Derek Hess, Brian Jasinski, Nancy Schwartz Katz, Milan Kecman, Jake Kelly, George Kocar, Joe Lanzilotta, Angela Oster, Josh Usmani, Justin Michael Will, and Sean Higgins and Nicholas Rezabek of the Bubble Process.

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Volume 10, Issue 3, Posted 6:32 PM, 02.28.2017

WRC's 25th-anniversary season continues with March performances

Western Reserve Chorale (WRC) will present a double billing of Haydn’s Mass in Time of War (Missa in tempore belli) and Requiem for the Living by Daniel Forrest. Concerts will take place Sunday, March 12, at 4 p.m., at Mary Queen of Peace Church, at 4423 Pearl Road, in Cleveland; and Sunday, March 19, at 3:30 p.m., at Church of the Gesu, 2470 Miramar Blvd., in University Heights. WRC is a Cleveland Heights-based chorus of nearly 100 singers from across the region.

The two works, composed 218 years apart, provide a glimpse of the spectrum of compositional styles which have been used in liturgical choral/orchestral works.

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Volume 10, Issue 3, Posted 11:10 AM, 03.01.2017

Dobama presents Pulitzer Prize-winner 'The Flick'

Kernels of stale buttered popcorn, sticky soda spills, and the occasional sandwich wrapper keep three underpaid employees of a run-down movie theater busy in “The Flick” by Annie Baker. Its regional premiere runs March 3–26 at Dobama Theatre, and is directed by Nathan Motta, Dobama’s artistic director.

In awarding “The Flick” the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, the Pulitzer committee cited it as “a thoughtful drama with well-crafted characters . . . rendering lives rarely seen on the stage.”

The play’s unconventional setting situates the audience where the screen would be in a movie theater, facing rows of seats and aisles with a projection booth above.

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Volume 10, Issue 3, Posted 5:03 PM, 02.20.2017

Apollo's Fire goes around the world and Bach again

Apollo's Fire will feature J.S. Bach's music in its 25th-anniversary season as an homage to this master of the Baroque style. This winter, Apollo's Fire performances will demonstrate the widespread reach of Bach’s music in two programs, "Virtuoso Bach" and "Sacred Bach."

From the sunny Orchestral Suite No. 1 to the darkly brooding Oboe Concerto in G minor, the principal musicians of Apollo’s Fire shine in "Virtuoso Bach: an Instrumental Extravaganza."

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Volume 10, Issue 2, Posted 12:48 PM, 01.31.2017

Music takes center stage at Heights Arts in February

As an antidote to the winter doldrums, Heights Arts has planned three free music performances during February in the nonprofit's gallery on Lee Road, plus the second concert of its popular Close Encounters series, which features members of The Cleveland Orchestra performing programs of their own design.

On Saturday, Feb. 11, at 8 p.m., the public is invited to join No Exit New Music Ensemble for an intimate evening of music that will spotlight three of the ensemble’s musicians: violinist Cara Tweed, percussionist Luke Rinderknecht, and pianist Nicholas Underhill. These virtuosi will be performing as a group and as soloists, bringing to Heights Arts the engaging performances that Clevelanders have come to expect from No Exit. Included on the program will be music from early-American avant-garde composer, pianist and inventor George Antheil, and the world premiere of a new work by Emily Koh.

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Volume 10, Issue 2, Posted 6:24 PM, 01.30.2017

Poets must apply by Feb. 10 to compete in Haiku Death Match

Heights Arts seeks contestants for its annual Haiku Death Match, the fun and irreverent event in which a Haiku Master is chosen by the audience. The event will take place this year on Saturday, April 8, at 7 p.m., at Dobama Theatre.

Poets who wish to compete and can firmly commit to the April 8 date must contact Heights Arts by Feb. 10 at heightswrites@heightsarts.org. Contestants will be accepted in order of application, and the eight chosen will later meet to review the rules and the structure of the event.

The number of competing poets is limited to eight this year, so that each may have more time to hurl syllable-sharp weapons, and so that the audience will have more performance evidence with which to measure the skill of each contestant.

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Volume 10, Issue 2, Posted 9:34 AM, 01.24.2017

The Night Alive opens at Dobama

Two shadowy figures enter a garbage-strewn apartment in Dublin, Ireland—a young woman covered in blood and the older man who has just rescued her from a beating by her boyfriend. 

These are the opening moments of "The Night Alive" by Conor McPherson, which is having its regional premiere at Dobama Theatre, Jan. 20 through Feb. 12.

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Volume 10, Issue 1, Posted 10:26 AM, 01.03.2017

HYT celebrates community with 'Godspell'

Come sing about love, enjoy all good gifts, and learn your lessons well with the Heights Youth Theatre’s (HYT) production of Stephen Schwartz’s classic “Godspell,” opening Friday, Jan. 20. The show is appropriate for all ages.

As told through a variety of games, storytelling techniques, music and dance, the parables of Jesus Christ come to life in this modern take on a timeless tale of loyalty, friendship and love.

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Volume 10, Issue 1, Posted 10:23 AM, 01.03.2017

Heights Arts kicks off 2017 with two exhibitions and some Zeitgeist

A portrait is commonly considered to be a painting, drawing, photograph, or engraving of a person, especially one depicting only the face or head and shoulders. Considering that the human face is one of the first things babies recognize, just weeks after being born, one might think that the artistic process of creating a portrait would be easy. Yet a truly engaging portrait conveys more than just a likeness, as viewers will see in the first Heights Arts exhibition of 2017.

“Likeness,” which opens Friday, Jan. 13, brings together six Northeast Ohio artists who approach the portrait from different perspectives.

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Volume 10, Issue 1, Posted 10:31 AM, 01.03.2017

CH artist Kuehnle's interactive work is focus of Akron exhibition

Jimmy Kuehnle’s work frequently comprises huge, three-dimensional sculptural pieces, depicting bicycles, clothing and other items. Some of his work is also performance art—pieces he can ride or otherwise interact with physically.

Kuehnle, 37, lives in Cleveland Heights and is an assistant professor in the foundation department at the Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA). He has won many awards for his work, which he has exhibited both nationally and internationally. Kuehnle’s work is currently on view at the Akron Museum of Art, in an exhibition titled “Jimmy Kuehnle: Wiggle, Giggle, Jiggle,” open through Feb. 19.

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Volume 10, Issue 1, Posted 10:17 AM, 01.03.2017

UH Symphonic Band performs at JCU Dec. 1

The University Heights Symphonic Band will kick off the holiday season and put everyone in a festive mood with a free concert. The program will take place Thursday, Dec. 1, at 7 p.m., in John Carroll University's Dolan Science Center Atrium.

The 45-member band, under the direction of Matthew Salvaggio, is now in its 47th year. The ensemble consists of outstanding local musicians, who present the best of concert band music. Its diverse membership includes professional musicians, engineers, homemakers, educators, medical specialists and others—even a rocket scientist. 

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Volume 9, Issue 12, Posted 12:03 PM, 11.29.2016

St. Paulís winter art show explores perception of place

The Nicholson B. White Gallery at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 2747 Fairmount Blvd., announces its winter show, Perception of Place: Pattern and Palette. The show opened with an artists’ reception on Friday, Dec. 2, with participating artists in attendance to greet guests and discuss their creative processes. The show runs through March 5.

Featured artists are Barbara Eisenberg (mixed media prints), Lari Jacobson (acrylic on canvas), Theresa Yondo (sculptural ceramics) and Gunter Schwegler (painting on silk).

Barbara Eisenberg creates abstract prints. Her art develops from an abiding interest in natural and imaginative forms, seeking simple bold shapes upon which to build. She places emphasis on spatial concepts and an intuitive response to these ideas. Her approach to each print includes incorporating as many technical and material variables as possible, without losing spontaneity or intensity.

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Volume 9, Issue 12, Posted 12:11 PM, 11.30.2016

Cruel Winter Festival showcases the best in local hip-hop

Greater Cleveland’s original live music scene has been on fire in recent years, exemplified by the growth and success of high-profile events such as Brite Winter Festival, Larchmere PorchFest, and the Heights Music Hop. While those three festivals have received plenty of attention, another festival with close ties to them has been flying low on the radar. Cruel Winter Festival, highlighting Cleveland’s burgeoning hip-hop scene, is poised to return for its third season.

This year’s Cruel Winter Festival is scheduled for Friday, Dec. 9, at the Grog Shop in Cleveland Heights. More than 15 musical acts will take the stage between 7 p.m. and 2 a.m.

Wallace Settles (aka Dirty Jones), is the founder of Cruel Winter Festival. A local music promoter, Settles has been involved with each of the three aforementioned festivals. He focused on adding hip-hop components to those events, increasing the diversity of genres and performers offered by each, to a very enthusiastic response.

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Volume 9, Issue 12, Posted 11:48 AM, 11.30.2016

Western Reserve Chorale performs free holiday concert Dec. 3

The Western Reserve Chorale (WRC) will present its traditional Holiday Concert on Sunday, Dec. 3, at 7 p.m., at Disciples Christian Church, 3663 Mayfield Road in Cleveland Heights. No tickets are necessary.

A reception will follow the concert in the church’s social hall.

WRC, celebrating its 25th year as a community chorus, will honor the late John Roberts, who passed away last spring at the concert. He was one the founders of the chorus and served as its conductor for 10 years.

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Volume 9, Issue 12, Posted 11:55 AM, 11.30.2016

Heights Music Shop hosts popular open-mic events

If you enjoy live music and are a fan of some of Cleveland’s music stars, you should check out the open-mic events at the Heights Music Shop at 2174 Lee Road in Cleveland Heights. These events are held on the first Sunday of every month, from 3 to 6 p.m.

While many open mics only allow acoustic music, the Music Shop's feature a wide variety of instruments, and, at last month's, the shop provided drums and keyboards, so many of the musicians were able to perform with a band setup.

Rick Szekelyi, the store's owner, said, “We love being part of the local music community, and the open mics are one way we can do that.” Prior to opening the store in November 2015, Szekelyi hosted open mics at Stone Oven, the Lee Road restaurant and bakery. He said he thinks one reason the Music Shop’s open mics are so great is because of the musicians who attend the events.

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Volume 9, Issue 12, Posted 11:52 AM, 11.30.2016

CH poet and resident uses grant to spread poetry

Catherine Wing has won many awards for her poetry over the years. The Cleveland Heights resident started writing when she was 8, and titled her first poem “J Is for Jello.” She wrote her first book, Bug Town, at the same age. It was a story about ants versus beetles, and how they wind up destroying each other.

“I wrote things all through childhood,” said Wing, now 44. “I wanted to be a ballet dancer more than a writer, but that became a non-option.”

Wing’s first book of poetry, Enter Invisible, was published in 2005, and was nominated for a Los Angeles Times book prize. Gin & Bleach, her second book of poetry, came out in 2012. One of her poems, “The Darker Sooner,” about autumn, was featured in Best American Poetry, 2010.

In 2016, the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture (CPAC) named Wing a Creative Workforce Fellow, awarding her a project-based grant.

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Volume 9, Issue 12, Posted 11:51 AM, 11.30.2016

Apolloís Fire performs 'Love in Venice'

Venice, where East meets West, was one of the world’s greatest artistic centers that fostered geniuses of Western art music, such as Monteverdi and Vivaldi. Simultaneously, the city was alive with the sounds of Sephardic romances, dances by Jewish composer Salamone Rossi, and Arab improvisations. Cleveland Heights-based Apollo’s Fire continues its 25th-anniversary season with an eclectic program that celebrates the sounds of the City of Water, Love in Venice.

Apollo’s Fire musicians Olivier Brault and Kathie Stewart lead the ensemble in Vivaldi’s Autumn violin concerto and LaNotte flute concerto. Sopranos Amanda Powell and Erica Schuller and tenor Owen McIntosh sing Monteverdi’s timeless love duets that remind us that love knows no ethnic boundaries.

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Volume 9, Issue 11, Posted 7:53 PM, 11.01.2016

CH's Ronna Kaplan impacts lives through music therapy

Music therapist Ronna Kaplan, who was born, and grew up, in Cleveland Heights, has a Heights teacher to thank for leading her to her profession.

“My senior year at Heights High,” recalled Kaplan, “we had a new band director named Robert Bergantino. When it was my turn to audition, he asked about my career aspirations. I said I wanted to go into a social service field and he said, ‘You should be a music therapist.’”

“Then, my mom told me that they had music therapy at The Music Settlement (TMS). She knew that because she’d been driving me to the Settlement for flute, theory and piano lessons since I was 10, and she often read the course catalog while she waited,” said Kaplan.

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Volume 9, Issue 11, Posted 10:04 AM, 11.01.2016

Peter and the Starcatcher returns to Dobama for the holidays

Peter and the Starcatcher, which won five Tony Awards, returns to Dobama Theatre for the 2016 holiday season. The Plain Dealer named last year’s Dobama production of Starcatcher one of the Top 10 Theater Productions of 2015, and it was an enormous hit with children of all ages.

Starcatcher, a prequel to James M. Barrie’s immortal Peter Pan, finds 13-year-old Molly Aster in the company of pirates, a giant crocodile, and some unusual singing mermaids. Adventures abound as Molly and three orphan boys (one of whom is the future Peter Pan) attempt to return a trunk of precious “starstuff” to her father as the pirate captain Black Stache and his sidekick, Smee, pursue them.

A dozen actors will portray more than 100 characters using talent, theatrical magic and the limitless possibilities of imagination. Among the returning cast members are audience favorites Christopher Bohan as Black Stache, Andrew Gorell as Smee, Luke Wehner as Peter and Molly Israel as Molly.  

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Volume 9, Issue 11, Posted 7:47 PM, 11.01.2016

Auerbach-Brown is a 2016 Creative Workforce Fellow

Music has been an important part of Christopher Auerbach-Brown’s life since he was in second grade. That was when he started taking guitar lessons from his father. Now, nearly 40 years later, Auerbach-Brown’s life focuses on music.

He is a sound artist and composer, and a member of Trepanning Trio, an acoustic instrumental group that has released three CDs, and the Quiet Trance Ensemble, a group that holds community improvisation evenings. He is also the conductor of the Amati Chamber Orchestra, a string ensemble at The Music Settlement, and he has taught music classes at various schools in the Cleveland area, including The Music Settlement, Lakeland Community College and the Cleveland Institute of Art.

Auerbach-Brown was named a Creative Workforce Fellow at the beginning of 2016 by the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture (CPAC).

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Volume 9, Issue 11, Posted 7:04 PM, 11.01.2016

Heights Arts Holiday Store celebrates 15 years of showcasing local artists

Part of Heights Arts's mission as a community nonprofit is to showcase and support our region's artists, whether they are visual, literary or musical. Northeast Ohio—and particularly Cleveland Heights—is a hotbed of creative talent.

This season, Heights Arts hosts its largest holiday store since it first opened its doors on Lee Road as a pop-up gallery in 2001. Beginning on Friday, Nov. 4, and running through Dec. 30, the store will be filled with a broad selection of giftable art—ceramics, glass, jewelry, painting, printmaking, photography, fiber works, artist tees, paper crafts and handmade holiday cards, as well as artisan items for the home and for the littlest ones in the family (not to mention poetry chapbooks and CDs from Cleveland musicians). That's one long list, but it is a reflection of the depth and variety of local talent as the Heights Arts Holiday Store fills the entire gallery space with works from more than 80 artists.

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Volume 9, Issue 11, Posted 10:11 AM, 11.01.2016

Nov. 5 author event will benefit women's education

The Cleveland Heights Chapter Q of P.E.O. International will host an intimate afternoon with author D.M. Pulley on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2 p.m., at Forest Hill Presbyterian Church, 3031 Monticello Blvd. in Cleveland Heights. Proceeds will benefit P.E.O. International Projects for Women’s Education.

The afternoon will include a book reading, Q-and-A session, and book signing by Pulley, the 2014 winner of Amazon’s Breakthrough Novel award for her debut novel, The Dead Key. Her latest novel, The Buried Book, was published in August. She lives in Greater Cleveland with her husband and two sons, and writes in the mystery/thriller genre. 

This is the fifth annual author event hosted by Chapter Q, a philanthropic educational organization. The event showcases popular Greater Cleveland authors, promotes literacy and raises money to educate women. Previous featured authors were James Renner, Thrity Umrigar, Mary Doria Russell and Sam Thomas.

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Volume 9, Issue 11, Posted 11:54 AM, 11.01.2016

Big Fun hosts book signing for Heights Hall-of-Famer Henkin

On Nov. 9, 7–8 p.m., local author Barry Henkin will sign copies of his 2014 autobiography, Why Am I So Special, at Big Fun, 1814 Coventry Road.

Henkin, who has faced developmental challenges since birth, wrote the book in the hopes of motivating others to live their lives to their fullest potential.

A 2013 inductee into the Heights High Hall of Fame, Henkin is also a two-time gold-medal-winning Special Olympian.

“Hosting this book signing is an honor,” said Steve Presser, owner of Big Fun and a longtime friend of Henkin.

Henkin is an advocate for, and inspiration to, individuals living with disabilities and challenges, and is a popular motivational speaker.

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Volume 9, Issue 11, Posted 11:42 AM, 11.01.2016

'Naked Trump' auction Oct. 26 to benefit Heights art funding

Gray’s Auctioneers has announced its Oct. 26 live and online auction featuring the naked Donald Trump sculpture, “The Emperor Has No Balls,” by artist Joshua “Ginger” Monroe.

The auction catalogue went live on Oct. 7, and the sculpture will be lot #1 in Gray’s Oct. 26 auction. The estimate is $10,000 to $20,000. A private preview for serious bidders began Oct. 19 and runs through Oct. 25. Gray’s Auctioneers will display a life-sized photograph of the sculpture in its showroom throughout the preview period. The bidding will start at 11 a.m. EST. To place a bid or follow the auction, visit https://auctions.graysauctioneers.com/lots/view/1-4YWU9.

Proceeds from the sale will benefit public art funding in the Coventry Village Special Improvement District (the neighborhood where the sculpture was placed by American activist collective INDECLINE), citywide public art projects to be developed by community arts nonprofit Heights Arts, and artist Monroe, who created the piece pro bono.

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Volume 9, Issue 11, Posted 11:58 AM, 10.25.2016

Apolloís Fire celebrates 25 years

Celebrating 25 years in Northeast Ohio, the Cleveland Heights-based Apollo’s Fire is set to begin its 2016–17 season under artistic director Jeannette Sorrell. Committed to performing Baroque music the way it was meant to be performed—alive and full of emotional impact—Apollo’s Fire brings world-class performances practically to your doorstep.

The season will begin in October with Resplendent Purcell, a large-scale program of choral works never before heard on period instruments in Northeast OhioHenry Purcell wrote his most majestic music for royal events at Westminster Abbey—from joyous birthday celebrations to the heartbreakingly beautiful lamentations at Queen Mary’s funeral. The program will bring together vocal soloists and the acclaimed Apollo’s Singers, with strings, lutes, recorders, trumpets, percussion and organ.

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Volume 9, Issue 10, Posted 2:57 PM, 09.30.2016

Heights Arts announces 11th Close Encounters chamber music series

Auditioning for and winning a job with an ensemble like the Cleveland Orchestra is a dream come true for a classical musician. Anyone who has attended a few concerts at Severance Hall can attest why: The combination of awesome power and incredible refinement is astonishing. But symphonic music is rarely the only reason a virtuosic performer loves to play. For many, the intimacy and expressive intensity of chamber music—just a few instruments playing together in a small space without a conductor—is the utmost expression of their personal connection to music.

For 11 years, the Heights Arts Close Encounters series has provided audiences the opportunity to hear music that is never performed in symphony halls, and is played with passionate intensity in intimate settings where the instruments are as close as a person sitting across the dinner table.

Tickets are on sale now, with full-series subscriptions available for $200 to the general public, and $160 for Heights Arts members. Individual concert tickets are $15 for students, $45 for Heights Arts members, and $55 for the general public. Venues will be revealed as the season progresses.

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Volume 9, Issue 10, Posted 2:31 PM, 09.30.2016

Nighttown hosts presidential debate party on Sept. 26

As the 2016 U.S. presidential candidates prepare to debate each other for the first time on national television, popular music venue Nighttown, located at 12387 Cedar Road in Cleveland Heights, will host a 2016 Presidential Debate Party on Monday, Sept. 26. The event begins with pre-debate entertainment at 7 p.m. prior to the much anticipated bout between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. The debate runs from 9–10:30 p.m. via large screen TV's on Nighttown's stage, and airs live from Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY.

The pre-debate show begins with a trivia contest, followed by the singing political satirists, The Debatables—A Non-Partisan Trio, presented by The Cleveland Cabaret Project. Fresh off their recent Nighttown success with 2016: A Political Race ODDyssey, The Debatables perform politically-incorrect musical satire. The trio consists of Rob Gibb, Tina D. Stump and Lora Workman.

Following that, students from the Baldwin Wallace University Musical Theatre Program, considered one of the finest in the country, will entertain with a program of political showtunes.

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Volume 9, Issue 10, Posted 11:44 AM, 09.20.2016

Dobama Theatre presents An Octoroon

Dobama Theatre continues its 57th season with An Octoroon by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, a modern deconstruction of Dion Boucicault’s The Octoroon.

Premiering in 1859, The Octoroon was one of the most successful stage productions of its time. At one point, seven different theater companies toured the United States with their productions of the play. It is famous for sparking a national debate about the abolition of slavery and the role of political theater. But when its melodramatic depiction of the antebellum South is viewed from a modern perspective, it appears not only simplistic, but also somewhat racist.

Using Boucicault’s plot as a template, contemporary playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’ An Octoroon critiques the earlier play’s depiction of race and confronts how theater interacts with identity.  An Octoroon was the co-winner of the 2014 Obie Award for Best New American Play (along with another Jacobs-Jenkins’ play, Appropriate).  

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Volume 9, Issue 10, Posted 2:08 PM, 09.30.2016

HYT celebrates community with The Music Man

If you’re looking for an entertaining and meaningful activity for the whole family, consider attending Heights Youth Theatre’s (HYT) production of The Music Man at Monticello Middle School in Cleveland Heights. The show opens on Saturday, Oct. 22, and runs through Sunday, Oct. 30.

Cast and crew, and everyone involved in the production, are excited to bring this classic American musical to a local stage. Talented kids from Cleveland Heights, University Heights and Shaker Heights, and several other Cleveland suburbs, are ready to transform the theater into the small Midwestern town of River City, Iowa. They will take the audience back to a simpler time when community and family were the paramount values by which society lived.

Kelly Monaghan directs the show, with music direction by Stacy Bolton. Sixty-eight student actors in grades one through 12 will sing and dance. The lead cast members are Brian Tuohey as Harold Hill and Courtney Foerg as Marian.

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Volume 9, Issue 10, Posted 2:21 PM, 09.30.2016

Heights Arts's Pet Project supports animal welfare

Starting this fall, art is going to the dogs—as well as cats, rabbits, and possibly even guinea pigs—as Heights Arts launches Pet Project, an ongoing custom-portraiture program in which pet owners and adopters can provide a photograph of their pet and choose a participating artist to create an original, personal portrait of their animal. A percentage of the portrait fee goes directly to Northeast Ohio animal welfare organizations.

The idea for Pet Project originated with the community arts organization's executive director, Rachel Bernstein. "My passion for the arts and my passion for causes that promote the humane treatment of animals collided in my brain and out popped the idea of Pet Project!" she said. "My hope is that this project will cross-pollinate awareness between the two causes: to make art accessible to those who might not otherwise have considered it, and also benefit the community of animals and animal lovers in a creative way."

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Volume 9, Issue 10, Posted 2:46 PM, 09.30.2016

CH duo Red Brick Rhoades makes beautiful music

Becca Rhoades and Red Chrosniak have been making music together for about five years. The two met in 2011 when they were both contra dancing (similar to square dancing) at Grace Lutheran Church in Cleveland Heights. Both of them loved music, and they became good friends.

The couple, who married in 2014, perform as a duo, Red Brick Rhoades. Rhoades explained how they came up with the name: “Before we started dating, there were a lot of brick roads in our lives. In addition, on one of our first dates, we went for a walk on two brick roads.”

Rhoades, who’s 30, grew up in Lubbock, Texas, the hometown of rock music pioneer Buddy Holly. “There’s a lot of good music there,” she said. She started playing violin when she was 4, and by the time she was in high school, she decided to make music the focus of her life. She atteded Texas Tech University, where she majored in music performance. After graduating in 2009, she moved to Cleveland to attend the Cleveland Institute of Music, and received her master’s degree in music performance in 2012.

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Volume 9, Issue 10, Posted 3:03 PM, 09.30.2016

CH residents open homes to visiting artists

Cleveland Heights considers itself a home to the arts, and, when many out-of-town musicians and other artists are in the Cleveland area, they stay at the homes of Cleveland Heights residents.

“Cleveland Heights bills itself as ‘home for the arts’ because of the many arts organizations in our community,” said Mary Dunbar, Cleveland Heights council member. “But the city is also home to a great many artists, including visiting artists. Heights hospitality to musicians in town for a short term for performances is an essential contribution to some of our most innovative, regionally and even globally celebrated musical-arts organizations.”

Apollo’s Fire, the Cleveland Baroque Orchestra, plays concerts all around Northeast Ohio. Only about half of its musicians live in the Cleveland area, and, according to Allison Richards, the organization’s artistic operations manager, there are about 25 households, most of them in Cleveland Heights, where the musicians stay when they are playing with the orchestra.

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Volume 9, Issue 10, Posted 11:38 AM, 09.30.2016

Annual book arts festival has roots in the Heights

Octavofest: Celebrating the Book and Paper Arts is in its eighth year of organizing and promoting book-related events throughout Greater Cleveland during the month of October. (Referencing the page size produced by folding a sheet of paper three times to produce eight leaves, the octavo is still a common size for printed books.)

Octavofest events range from lectures, workshops and public demonstrations to exhibitions and tours of rare book collections. Heights Libraries always sponsors several programs, and this year is no exception.

On Oct. 3, explore the world “on one sheet of paper” at a cartography presentation at the Lee Road Library. On Oct. 13, at the Noble Neighborhood Library, adults can construct bird houses made entirely of discarded books. On Oct. 24, the Lee Road Library will host a Readers’ Theatre with Dobama Theatre that celebrates book history from ancient Alexandria to the present day. See the Heights Libraries (www.heightslibrary.org) or Octavofest (http://www.octavofest.com/) websites for details on these and other Octavofest events.

 

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Volume 9, Issue 10, Posted 11:37 AM, 09.30.2016

Trump statue to benefit public art in the Heights

Regardless of your politics or your thoughts on the “Naked Trump” statue that briefly appeared in the Coventry Village Business District in Cleveland Heights on Aug. 18, you may appreciate that some good will come of it. On Sept. 16, artist Joshua Monroe, who goes by the name of Ginger, flew into Cleveland to pay an impound fee of $110 and retrieve his property from the Cleveland Heights Police Department. Representatives of Heights Arts and Coventry Village Special Improvement District (SID) were on hand to help with the transaction as Ginger had agreed to offer the statue for auction to benefit the funding of public art in Coventry Village and throughout Cleveland Heights.

Ginger had created five life-size foam statues of U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump, pro-bono, for an anonymous artists collective called Indecline. The group placed them in prominent public spaces in four major U.S. cities on Aug. 18—New York, Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles—and in Cleveland Heights.

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Volume 9, Issue 10, Posted 11:22 AM, 09.20.2016

Dobama Theatre opens season with a love story

Dobama Theatre is off to a strong start in its 2016–17 season, leading with The Mystery of Love & Sex, written by Bathsheba Doran and directed by Shannon Sindelar. Dobama’s theme this season is identity, and Doran’s play is the perfect example of the meaning and importance of identity.

The play focuses primarily on two characters, Charlotte and Jonny, best friends since they were 9 years old. They have identifiable differences, however. Charlotte is white and Jewish; Jonny is black and Christian. These differences strengthen their connection . . . until love and sex complicate things in surprising and compelling ways.

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Volume 9, Issue 9, Posted 12:06 PM, 09.01.2016

Heights Music Hop returns Sept. 23 & 24

The Heights will be hopping again this fall, Sept. 23 and 24, as the Heights Music Hop returns—bigger and better than ever. This fourth-annual festival, presented by FutureHeights, has become one of the region’s premier events, featuring live music, art, food, local merchants and a showcase of Cleveland Heights business districts. Nearly 70 musical acts are expected to perform during the free festival.

For the first time, the Hop will run for two days instead of just one, and will move beyond the Cedar Lee Business District. On Friday, Sept. 23, the live music festival will kick off at 5 p.m. in the Cedar Fairmount Business District, and then move to Cedar Lee on Saturday, Sept. 24, where performances will begin at 3 p.m.

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Volume 9, Issue 9, Posted 10:16 AM, 08.30.2016

St. Paulís autumn art show draws on inspiration

The fall show at the Nicholson B. White Gallery at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Drawing On Inspiration, will open on Friday, Sept. 9, with an artists’ reception 5–7 p.m

On hand to greet guests and discuss their creative processes will be Nancy Underhill (colored pencil on paper), Shyvonne Coleman (lithographs), Jaymi Zents (painting on birch wood) and Judy Goskey (cloisonné).

Underhill’s drawings and wall reliefs have been exhibited throughout the Midwest and are included in corporate, public and private collections. In her work, the geometric lines of architectural forms are often accompanied by human, animal and foliage elements. She is a member of the Colored Pencil Society of America.

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Volume 9, Issue 9, Posted 2:39 PM, 09.01.2016

Burning River Baroque to spotlight work by female composers

Burning River Baroque will present Twisted Fate: Famed and Forgotten Female Composers on Saturday, Sept. 17, at 7 p.m., at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church in Cleveland Heights (2555 Euclid Heights Blvd.)

The history of western art music predominantly focuses on the lives and works of male teachers, composers and performers. In eras when women rarely had access to the same educational and professional opportunities as their male colleagues, it can be easy to presume that women were simply not as productive and successful in the field. A closer look at history, however, reveals that some women were able to rise above the gender restrictions placed on them and achieved great success as professional musicians. Others led more private professional lives, cloistered in abbeys and composing for their fellow sisters.

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Volume 9, Issue 9, Posted 12:46 PM, 09.01.2016

Artist workspaces are coming soon to Coventry Village

Less then two years ago, Artful was just an idea in the minds of Shannon Morris and Brady Dindia, longtime Heights residents. Their passion to provide affordable workspaces for artists on Cleveland’s East Side soon attracted other artists, educators, professionals and local business owners.

The two women formed a board of directors, with Morris as executive director and Dindia as board president. Rachel Williams is board secretary, Kevin Khayat is treasurer, and Sarah Curry, David King, Eric Mundson and Hillary Lyon are among the remaining founding members.  

After a thorough search, the board is excited to announce that Artful has leased approximately 5,300 sq. feet of space in Coventry School building, located at 2843 Washington Blvd. in Cleveland Heights.

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Volume 9, Issue 9, Posted 11:34 AM, 09.01.2016

UH Symphonic Band welcomes new members

This month, the University Heights Symphonic Band begins its 47th year as a community ensemble and its second year under the direction of Matthew Salvaggio, who is also music director for the Hiram College Wind Ensemble and music librarian/staff arranger for the Cleveland Pops Orchestra. Sponsored by the City of University Heights, the 45-member band draws musicians from throughout Northeast Ohio. The band’s diverse membership includes professional musicians, along with engineers, homemakers, professors, nurses and others—even a rocket scientist. From students in their 20s to retirees in their 90s, they are drawn together by their love of music.  

The University Heights Symphonic Band began in 1970 as a summer-season performing group under the direction of Harvey Sisler. Organized under the auspices of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights Board of Education, the band initially rehearsed and performed at Wiley Middle School. In 1974, the band adopted a year-round schedule, University Heights became its sponsor and it moved to John Carroll University (JCU). Fourteen years later, the band moved back to Wiley Middle School, until the school closed in 2014 to become the temporary home of Cleveland Heights High School. The ensemble now holds its rehearsals at Roxboro Middle School and its summer concerts at JCU.

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Volume 9, Issue 9, Posted 12:37 PM, 09.01.2016

Artists, music and talks kick off Heights Arts's fall season

For more than four decades, Herbert Ascherman Jr. has been a fixture in the photographic landscape of Cleveland. While best known for his portrait studio, Ascherman has also pursued other threads throughout his career—landscapes, nudes and street photography—as well as portraiture. Opening Labor Day weekend, Herbert Ascherman Jr.: 40 Years gathers approximately 60 key works, selected by Ascherman and Heights Arts, which powerfully represent his wide-ranging career.

The exhibition features new gelatin silver and platinum prints drawn from the 120,000 black-and-white negatives in Ascherman's archive, printed in small editions on the occasion of this show.

“The essence of a retrospective is the desire of a photographer to share his most personal and intimate observations with his friends,” explained Ascherman. “The photographs in this exhibition are moments found or studied, objects of curiosity and interest, thoughts considered and shared. I have never worked with a social, political, religious or philosophical perspective or bias. I just take pictures of what appeals to me at the moment; printing them by hand and presenting them as tangible artifacts.”

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Volume 9, Issue 9, Posted 12:35 PM, 08.30.2016

Western Reserve Chorale announces its 25th season

The upcoming 2016–17 season of the Western Reserve Chorale (WRC) marks its 25th year as a community chorus. The ensemble, with a roster of nearly 100 singers, welcomes all Greater Cleveland residents to celebrate with them during this anniversary season.  

WRC will present three separate concerts during the upcoming season.

Its traditional holiday concert, to be held at Disciples Christian Church in Cleveland Heights on Dec. 4, will be performed in honor of John Roberts, founding conductor of WRC who passed away this past spring. WRC hopes all who may have sung with the ensemble, at any time in its history, will attend the performance and after-concert reception. The program will include Fantasia on Christmas Carols by Vaughan Williams, and two collections of seasonal settings: the first by Jackson Berkey (arranger for Mannheim Steamroller), and the second, three spirituals by William Dawson. Additional music by Palestrina, Bach, Verdi and Rutter, and two newer works by Norwegian composer Kim André Arensen, will round out the programming.

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Volume 9, Issue 8, Posted 6:05 PM, 07.29.2016

Young CH singer takes inspiration from the past

Alyssa Boyd began singing when she was about 6 years old. Now she’s 24, and singing is the focus of her life. She regularly performs with Seth Boyle, an acoustic guitar player, and with a local band called the Rifferees that performs jazz and big-band classics.

“I grew up with a lot of music,” Boyd said. “My grandmother played piano, and my dad loved soul music, rock and roll and the blues. But no one in my family ever pursued music as a career.”

Boyd was born in the Philadelphia area. When she was a sophomore in high school, her family moved to Cleveland Heights. She attended Heights High, graduating in 2011. She gives the school a lot of credit for developing her singing skills. “The Vocal Music Department at Heights High really changed my life,” she said. “I was given opportunities to do solos. I got into the Cleveland Orchestra Youth Chorus, and I got to sing at Severance Hall. I also took vocal lessons at Heights High, and my vocal coach really helped me understand music theory.”

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Volume 9, Issue 8, Posted 6:00 PM, 07.29.2016

Kathy Ewing writes with understanding and compassion

If you’ve spent time in a Cleveland Heights book group, you know there are many topics that come up. Books inspire thoughts about one’s own life. Of those many topics, a good majority of them are about families: How do you raise thoughtful, caring kids? Are men as unobservant as they sometimes seem? When is a good time to tell a family member that he or she has gone too far? And, of course, which of us was raised in the most dysfunctional family?

Kathy Ewing, a longtime member of a CH neighborhood book group, always had stories to tell that amazed and surprised. She described her dad as a kind, loving and connected—though, imperfect—parent, who became a paraplegic when he was a young father and husband.

Ewing’s mom, on the other hand, was rarely kind, loving or connected. Her mom was emotionally distant, unpredictable and deeply unhappy.

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Volume 9, Issue 8, Posted 5:52 PM, 07.29.2016

Dobama Emerging Actors Program performances begin July 28

Dobama Theatre continues its commitment to education programming with the seventh season of its Dobama Emerging Actors Program (DEAP), an intensive summer acting program for high school and college students.

This year’s DEAP production is a double bill of Greek drama: Ellen McLaughlin’s adaptations of “The Trojan Women” and “The Persians.”

The performances are at Dobama Theatre on Thursday, July 28, at 7:30 p.m.; Friday, July 29, and Saturday, July 30, at 8 p.m.; and Sunday, July 31, at 2:30 p.m. General admission tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Each performance will feature both productions.

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Volume 9, Issue 8, Posted 10:37 AM, 07.22.2016

Judson gallery exhibits work by resident Leonard Trawick

Retrospective: View with a Twist, featuring etchings, watercolors, and acrylics by Judson Park resident Leonard Trawick, will be on view at 
The Streeter Gallery at Judson Park July 22 thought Oct. 3. The public is invited to attend a reception with the artist on Friday July 22, 4:30–6:30 p.m.

An Alabama native, Trawick studied literature at the University of Chicago and the University of Dijon in France before receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard University. He taught English at Cleveland State University until he retired in 1998. Throughout his life, painting and drawing have been serious avocations, and he continues his work with help from the art faculty at Cleveland State University.

His prints and watercolors have been shown in various galleries. Through his work, Trawick tries to include a subjective element and portray an emotional impact, and his prints often contain fanciful or humorous ideas.

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Volume 9, Issue 8, Posted 12:45 PM, 07.19.2016

Win tickets to GroundWorks DanceTheater's performance at Cain Park

GroundWorks DanceTheater presents Carmina Burana at Cain Park's Alma Theater on July 15 and 16 at 7 p.m. and July 17 at 2 p.m. for their 2016 Summer Dance Series. GroundWorks will feature an expanded cast in an adaptation of Carl Orff's timeless classic. The program will also include a world premiere work by award-winning New York choreographer Adam Barruch. For ticket information, visit groundworksdance.org or call 216-751-0088.  

The local dance company is sponsoring a social media ticket giveaway contest on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Contestants are encouraged to share their most memorable dance experience using the hashtags listed below to be eligible to win a pair of free tickets to the Cain Park performance. Winners will be selected and notified on July 1. Learn more about the performances here: http://bit.ly/1UqX7kR

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Volume 9, Issue 8, Posted 3:09 PM, 06.27.2016

Paul Ferguson performs jazz and sacred music

Paul Ferguson is one of the most respected jazz musicians in all of Greater Cleveland. He is the director of jazz studies at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and the artistic director of the Cleveland Jazz Orchestra. He also plays trombone, and in addition to the eight CDs he has released, he performs with many other artists around the area.

Ferguson, who lives on East Fairfax Road in Cleveland Heights, is 55 years old. He is the father of two daughters: 22-year-old Kelsey Ferguson, who plays violin, often with her father; and 18-year-old Tyler, a recent graduate from Heights High.

Ferguson was born in Sandusky, Ohio. When he was four years old, his family moved to New Jersey. After about two years, the family moved back to Ohio and took up residence in Massillon.

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Volume 9, Issue 7, Posted 5:44 PM, 07.01.2016

Music Hop expands and returns this September

Heights Music Hop returns for its fourth consecutive year this September. And this year, the Hop is expanding. It will take place over two days, Sept. 23 and 24, instead of just one, and, in addition to the Cedar Lee neighborhood where the Hop has happened the last three years, it will also expand into the Cedar Fairmount neighborhood.

"We're excited to be able to grow this festival each year,” said Dan Budin, chair of the FutureHeights Music Hop Committee. “Our goal always has been to showcase the Heights as an arts and entertainment destination, while simultaneously supporting our business districts. The addition of Cedar Fairmount this year helps us to do just that. We have an incredible partnership with Cedar Lee, and its businesses have been great venues and sponsors, so we look forward to the continued high energy of a festival in Cedar Lee and to the inclusion of Cedar Fairmount and the new experiences its businesses have to offer." 

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Volume 9, Issue 7, Posted 4:40 PM, 06.30.2016

Appletree Books event celebrates Greater Cleveland neighborhoods

Appletree Books will host a special event on Friday, July 8, featuring four writers who have contributed to a new book about Greater Cleveland—Cleveland Neighborhood Guidebook. Belt Publishing, a Cleveland company that also publishes Belt Magazine, produced the book.

The four writers who will be taking part in the event are Brad Masi, Kathrine Morris, Greggor Mattson and Maryann De Julio.

Masi, who lives in Cleveland Heights, contributed a chapter called “Chasing the Ghosts of Coventry Village,” exploring the many changes that have taken place in the Coventry neighborhood over the years. He describes Dugway Brook as a “historic stream that has disappeared underground, locked away in concrete culverts beneath the hapless footfalls of the denizens above.” He then goes on to write about Harvey Pekar and poet d.a. levy. “Many writers, poets, artists, publishers and graphic novelists find their home here, and many more were hatched here before their winged migration to other territories,” Masi writes.

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Volume 9, Issue 7, Posted 10:34 AM, 06.28.2016

Heights Arts hosts flute and guitar concert on July 9

Classical guitarist Robert Gruca and flutist Linda White will present a diverse program of music based on folk styles from Eastern Europe and Japan on Saturday, July 9, at 7 p.m., in the Heights Arts gallery, 2175 Lee Road in Cleveland Heights, just south of the Cedar Lee Theatre.

The musicians will perform works by Serbian composer Dusan Bogdanovic, Hungarian Bela Bartok, and Masamitu Takahashi from Japan, as well as klezmer music written by American Carl Dimow. The family-friendly concert is open to the public, with free-will donations accepted to support Heights Arts's public music programs. A reception with refreshments follows the performance.

The Gruca White Ensemble was formed in 2013 as part of The Music Settlement’s Centennial Celebration, and became an Ensemble in Residence for the vibrant Cleveland community music school the following year.

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Volume 9, Issue 7, Posted 10:43 AM, 06.28.2016

Abstract drawings on view at Heights Arts

An exhibition of abstract drawings by Northeast Ohio artist Erik Neff opens Friday, June 24, with a public reception from 6 to 9 p.m. in the spotlight gallery space at Heights Arts.

Working on a variety of surfaces such as plaster, wood, paper and slate, Neff creates a dialogue, or narrative, between the marks and shapes of an image through a "back and forth" process of scraping, gouging and applying color pigments.

Neff has exhibited in galleries and museums in Cleveland, Youngstown, New York and Chicago, including MOCA Cleveland, SPACES gallery, and Elizabeth Harris Gallery. He lives and works in Newbury, Ohio.

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Volume 9, Issue 7, Posted 12:34 PM, 06.20.2016

Children's book author and illustrator visits Pinwheel Kids on June 4

On June 4, Cleveland author Lindsay Ward returns to Pinwheel Kids, at 3469 Fairmount Blvd., with her sixth and latest book, The Importance of Being 3. As parents know, age 3 is a very big year. Ward’s book follows three friends as they learn new things in threes—from triangles to tricycles.

According to Ward, "The idea for this book came from a project I was given while I was applying to graduate school. We were given three prompts, one of which was actually the number three. Although The Importance of Being 3 is different from my original concept, I would never have created the book had it not been for that initial idea. From there the book developed into the concept of what it’s like to be a certain age, the type of milestones associated with that age, as well as the challenges. I’ve always been interested in patterns, and loved the idea of merging being 3-years-old and things that come in threes."

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Volume 9, Issue 7, Posted 12:58 PM, 05.31.2016

Dobama announces winners of kidsí playwriting festival

Dobama Theatre has announced the winners of the 38th Annual Marilyn Bianchi Kids’ Playwriting Festival. Five of the winners are from Cleveland Heights: Ruby Tugeau (for “The Circus Pilot”), Harrison Vandall (for “Attack of the Village”), Anthony Koonce (for “The Tragedy of Nisslo’s Diner”), Jon Morrow Jr. (for “The Chase”), and Maple Buescher (for “I’m Going to Steal The Queen’s Crown”).

Other winning entries came from students in Cleveland, Shaker Heights, Highland Heights, Bedford, Lakewood, Solon and North Royalton, among other cities. The winning plays will be performed at Dobama Theatre June 3–5, during a free weekend of theater for all.

Dedicated to the memory of Marilyn Bianchi, Dobama’s founder, the Kids’ Festival was created in 1979 to help Cleveland-area children discover their own voice, self-worth, and creativity through theater. Following Bianchi’s death, her family established the festival as a way of introducing young people to the joys and rewards of live theater.

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Volume 9, Issue 6, Posted 12:09 PM, 05.24.2016

'To the Orchard' premieres at Dobama

Playwrights Local 4181 announces the world premiere of Cleveland-based writer Les Hunter’s “To the Orchard.” Directed by Dale Heinen, the play ran through June 5 at Waterloo Arts in North Collinwood, and from June 10–12 at Dobama Theatre. This is the first full production for Playwrights Local, a 501(c)3 company whose recent presentations have included the 2015 Cleveland Playwrights Festival.

In “To the Orchard,” college student Rachel Bergman reveals her sexual identity to her Orthodox Jewish father, who is struggling with his own secret. In coming to terms with each other—and themselves—the pair must reconcile the conflicting pulls of tradition and individual desire. The play takes place in Brooklyn in the recent past, but incorporates dreamlike visits to turn-of-the-century England and the lost Jewish Eastern Europe. The spirits of Robert Plant and Virginia Woolf add a touch of magic realism to this intimate work about making mistakes, coming clean, and the power of history and family.

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Volume 9, Issue 6, Posted 5:46 PM, 05.31.2016

Western Reserve Chorale performs operas and operettas on June 5

The Western Reserve Chorale (WRC), a community chorus of approximately 100 singers based in Cleveland Heights, will present the final concert of its 2015–16 season. Of Operas and Operettas provides an opportunity to hear some of the dynamic literature from these genres.

Accompanied by Joanne Poderis, and joined by soprano Natasha Ospina Simmons, WRC will present music from Verdi's Il TrovatoreAida and Nabucco, Wagner's Lohengrin and Tannhauser, Leoncavallo's Pagliacci, Purcell's Dido and Aeneus, Bizet's Carmen and others. The ensemble also will present some lighter fare from the world of operettas, including great chorus moments composed by Bernstein, Gilbert & Sullivan and Strauss.

The concert will take place at 4 p.m. on Sunday, June 5, at Cedar Hill Baptist Church, 12601 Cedar Road in Cleveland Heights. No tickets are necessary; the concert is open to the public with free-will donations accepted. There is ample free parking available, and the church is handicapped-accessible. There will be a reception immediately following the concert.

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Volume 9, Issue 6, Posted 5:22 PM, 05.31.2016

Canterra Musica performs on June 5

Arts in the Cathedral presents Canterra Musica at Church of the Saviour on Sunday, June 5, at 3:30 p.m. A free-will offering will be taken.

Canterra Musica is the most advanced treble choir of the Oberlin Choristers. Founded in 1991, Oberlin Choristers provides Northeast Ohio children and teenagers with an exceptional choral education. Singers in kindergarten through 12th grade are taught in five separate ensembles by master teachers who specialize in teaching healthy vocal production, music literacy and artistic expression. 

Canterra Musica, comprising auditioned singers in seventh- to 12th-grades, has traveled each year since 1995, singing in world-class venues, including the Sydney Opera House, Australia; St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Ireland; Chartres Cathedral, France; and Carnegie Hall, New York. The singers have participated in numerous festivals, honor choirs, and community events in collaboration with Oberlin College Opera Theatre, Cleveland Opera, Oberlin Summer Theatre Festival, and, most recently, as the guest choir for the world tour of Video Games Live. This summer the choir will perform in Philadelphia, Princeton, and Carnegie Hall. To find out more, visit www.ochoristers.org

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Volume 9, Issue 6, Posted 5:28 PM, 05.31.2016

Spring show features Heights artists

The work of Cleveland Heights and University Heights artists will be part of Hillcrest Art Club’s annual spring show, June 5–30.

The show will take place at the Beachwood Library, 25501 Shaker Blvd., and features an opening reception on Sunday, June 5, 2–4 p.m. Light refreshments will be served, and visitors will have a chance to meet the artists.

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Volume 9, Issue 6, Posted 5:40 PM, 05.31.2016